01
Mar 2017

You’ve figured out employer branding and have defined your ideal team.. But how do you get that message out to your dream candidates. They are not likely looking for a job, and if they are, the recruiting messages of hundreds of other growing tech companies just sounds like noise. How do you craft a message that is actually heard - and where do you tell the story? Step 1: Tell a Great the Story Storytelling brings your brand to life and allows you to build meaningful relationships with future employees. Here are a couple of tips: Think about your Who What drives your target employees? We know that what really drives engagement and love for a job is Autonomy, Purpose (Why) and Mastery (and here is a great video by Daniel Pink that drives this message home). Talk about the people behind the brand & their passion for impact While telling your company’s origin story (similar to a Superhero origin story) highlight the people behind the brand and why this mission is important to them. Share inspiring real life accounts that your future employees will connect with. (Read our blog post on developing a hero story - link) Build your brand personality Create a distinct tone of voice across all channels that separates you from your competitors and is easily recognizable. Think about your culture, your team, your workspace - does your tone and voice reflect this? Is it consistent with the what you project to customers? Step 2: Know Where the Story will be Heard Do you know the difference between employment branding and recruiting for a specific role? Recruiting for a role is typically reactive, you focus on tactics to find candidates for a specific profile. Great branding makes recruitment MUCH easier. Branding is about always recruiting - it is the overarching message to the your broad community of future hires. To the people you are targeting AND to those who influence them it says, “YOU WANT TO WORK HERE” To get that message heard, you need to think like your prospective employees. Find them in their natural habitat. Where are the top leaders, sales executives, developers and technical experts working, playing and spending time. What events do they attend? What websites do they frequent? What are they reading? Where do they drink coffee, play games, collaborate with peers on projects? Here are a couple of ideas on how and where to proactively engage prospective hires:

  • Hackathons
  • Webinars and meet-ups
  • Sponsor events relevant to your brand
  • Industry events and trade-shows
  • Challenges
  • Community and volunteer events
  • Social media and targeted online communities
  • Sponsor podcasts
So go out there and tell your emotionally engaging, problem solving, impactful origin story! Find your tribe.

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03
May 2016

When you’re looking for someone to hunt down new customers, land a million dollar partnership, find new investors or land the best executive talent, you need someone special. You need someone who will take up your cause and fight for it - sometimes against fierce competition and in the face of incredible odds.  This person must be resourceful, diligent, and fearless. Many would describe this ideal person as aggressive. I argue that, if you equate aggression with success in sales, business development or recruitment situations you will be sorely disappointed with what you find. I’ve met dozens of highly successful closers—people who sign million dollar contracts for undiscovered start-ups, land lucrative partnerships, or bring in world-class investors. They are all curious, competitive and confident. They can quickly sniff out a winning deal and like a dog on a bone, they find a way to make it happen. But is it aggression that gets them to the close? When I think about someone who is aggressive, I picture someone who is pushy and doesn’t listen to objections. Someone who uses bullying tactics to get the transaction done. But a great hunter is an incredible listener, someone who gathers up objections and finds creative solutions. No one wants to spend time with an aggressive person. When you send someone out to find customers, investors or teammates, they need to build positive relationships and be your ambassador. The great closer genuinely seeks to add value. An aggressive person makes you feel defensive and uncomfortable. If you do buy from them, you’re more likely to feel like you’ve been taken advantage of, or to regret the decision. The great closer, on the other hand, will build trusting relationships and leave customers and partners feeling overjoyed with their decision. Think about it. When you say you need someone aggressive, do you really mean someone confident, diligent, assertive and competitive? Do you also want someone likeable, who treats their teammates and customers with warmth and respect? Choose your words well, and don’t lose sight of the other positive traits that define a great closer and a great ambassador of your brand.

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06
Apr 2016

In tech hubs across North America, the success of innovation ecosystems hinge on start-up culture, where ideas and creativity that are free to blossom without the constraints of politics, red tape or inertia that exist within most big companies. And as these small and nimble companies emerge we see that they can disrupt existing markets, offering compelling solutions to customers, and exciting career opportunities for top talent, making it tough for large companies to compete. So, if you are leading an established big company, how can you stay on top of the technology impacting your industry? How do you develop innovative product ideas, or compete for talent that wants a creative work environment? It's likely that the very things that make your enterprise successful (the structure, process and policies that you need to be stable) will also stifle creativity and impede innovation. This is the quandry that gave rise to the Innovation Outpost. Clever execs from forward thinking big business are buildings teams of employees who don't fit the corporate mold.  Working outside the corporate environment, in eclectic offices located in the midst of the start-up ecosystem, these teams are building prototypes, challenging old assumptions and developing a unique culture. Here is how Communitech has described the Corporate Innovation program that is growing in Kitchener-Waterloo: The Communitech corporate innovation program is designed to help you harness your innovation potential by taking advantage of external models to supplement internal strategies. It allows you to shift your big brand culture and think like a startup, tap into fresh talent and ideas, create unlikely connections, speed up prototyping and significantly reduce the cost and risk associated with trying new things—all while staying true to your brand. Companies like GM, Fairfax, Canadian Tire, Canon, TD, and Deloitte have invested in this innovation strategy, and the results are starting to come together in real measurable ways - for customers, employees, shareholders and for the start-up ecosystem as a whole. Artemis Canada is proud to partner with Communitech and their Corporate Innovation Partners, to identify leaders within the community who can spearhead and manage the various Innovation Outposts. If you'd like to learn more about these unique and exciting opportunities, take a look at the general leadership profile and reach out to Kristina for more information.

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22
Mar 2016

I still remember the call. An HR Manager rang me a few years ago to say that her company had a no-headhunting policy. Not only did they refuse to pitch their opportunities to individuals who were already employed, but it was 'against the rules for other companies to speak to their people.' I found this shockingly naive and quite silly! It also came as no surprise that this company was struggling to stay alive in fierce talent market.

When I started in recruitment, companies would train receptionists to block recruiters’ calls, and ensure that Monster and Workopolis were banned from company internet. But these days recruiting messages are everywhere. It is impossible and impractical to block LinkedIn, Twitter, or to halt conference attendance and rendezvous’ with former colleagues and miscellaneous strangers in coffee shops. If you are losing top talent to the competition, it is logical to want to keep headhunters at bay. But the truth is your people have lives that extend beyond your four walls. In reality, trying to keep your people from connecting with headhunters is like building a fence around your yard to keep the birds in.

Good news!

Your best employees are probably not out there actively looking for a new job. They are too busy working, and solving problems, and networking on behalf your company. As your people evangelize your business, and get into the community to learn and grow professionally, you benefit – even though it makes them more visible. The top headhunters have the tools and the networks to find your most talented people – and your brightest stars have free will and are clever enough to entertain a conversation. Your best people are not only talking to headhunters, they are likely helping them! They are learning about your competitors and evaluating the teams, the technologies and the opportunities in the greater market. If you've done a good job providing them with the environment and challenge they desire, all of this could actually benefit your company.

The trick is not to hide your people from the headhunters

You have to make sure that your employees will always choose you even when they know what other options exist – because they just can’t imagine being more fulfilled somewhere else. If the headhunters are circling, it means that your people are the envy of your competition. Congratulations! But …if your people are never recruited it is not because you have a great ‘no-headhunting’ policy. It is because you have mediocre talent and maybe you need to deploy some good headhunters of your own.

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21
Mar 2016

I found this old post today, that I wrote back in 2009. The predictions are scary accurate, and the advice holds true!

There is talk lately about social media revolutionizing how companies recruit, with some concluding that we’re witnessing the end of the recruiting profession as we know it. While I agree that social media will transform recruiting, I don’t think it will make things any easier The arguments go like this:
  • Social media tools (LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, blogs etc.) will change the way companies find prospective employees. Search will be faster and more targeted.
  • Companies will use these tools to build relationships with pools of highly qualified individuals (who might work for them tomorrow or sometime in the future).
Here’s my take on how things will look and work after this big online wave washes over us. What happens when everyone can find anyone Imagine a utopia where everyone has a detailed online profile. Every recruiter will be able to ‘see’ all of the talent and companies will have equal opportunity to market to candidates. A world like that will soon be overflowing with competing messages. Generating a targeted message that will be heard above the noise will become increasingly difficult – and more critical. More than ever before, companies will compete for the top people in every industry. The war for talent will rage, but it will do so in an online world. How to win an online war for talent The companies that attract talent will be those who: A) Deliver a compelling story Recruiting great people will be like marketing and selling a product. A company’s message will not be the only one that candidates hear. HR will need to borrow strategies from PR. Companies will need to understand what motivates talented people and offer a ‘product’ (aka job description and career page) that gets them excited. For instance: Will they work with leaders and innovators?  Will they build revolutionary products or solve meaningful problems? Will they be challenged professionally and be given opportunity to grow? Remember, these people will probably be happily employed elsewhere. In order to entice them, the company must offer a compelling opportunity.  And the product message must be delivered professionally by real people who can answer tough questions. Finding the best candidates will be easier, but attracting them will be more difficult. Companies will also need to . . . B) Build long-term relationships with future candidates Smart companies will stop looking at recruitment as a reactive process characterized by bursts of frantic activity. Social media tools will enable companies to build an engaged audience of individuals interested in their message and their vision. Teams will be built based on the value great people can bring, rather than qualifying against a grocery list of skills and keywords. Many Recruiting Companies and Recruiters will Drown I am actually hopeful that a big wave of change is coming in the world of recruitment. I won’t miss the high-churn personnel agencies selling mediocre talent to desperate companies, or the recruitment departments that act more like purchasing teams than sales teams. In many ways this apocalyptic change will be good. The new world of recruiting will be smarter, faster and tougher. The role of the recruiter will change. As in every apocalypse, only the resourceful will survive.

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16
Mar 2016

“Job descriptions suck!” 

We’ve heard it a million times. With an abundance of job openings for the exceptional 90th percentile, every ad for tech talent looks and sounds the same: a list of demands sandwiched between flowery sentences describing creative work environments, snazzy perks, and products that will disrupt billion dollar markets. Since I started recruiting in tech more than 15 years ago, little has changed. To the talented individuals you’re looking to attract, your job ad is nothing but noise. I firmly believe that expecting success from a posting alone is insane, but I'll save that for another day. Invariably, a job profile of some sort fits into your overall strategy to hire for any role. And a bad one will sabotage all other efforts.

Why are job ads so wrong?

Most companies forget that a job description and a job ad are two different things. Often written by a hiring manager, job descriptions are intended to communicate to the team the specific responsibilities and duties that a new employee will perform. They typically include a list of skills, experience and knowledge required to do the job well. The job description tells us "what's in it for the company":

What will the new employee do for us?

What does the new employee need to know and be really good at in order perform the tasks listed in above.

It’s likely full of technical jargon and obvious catch-alls like “must be a team-player.” In most cases, it’s generic enough that it can be cut and pasted for every similar job opening for the next 3 years. Often, the writing of a job description is a painful and rushed exercise. The result is something resembling a purchase order. This approach to a job description is actually not wrong. Of course every search for a new teammate starts by identifying what needs to be done and by whom. What is wrong is that companies usually stop here and use this document as an ad.

So, what the heck is a job ad?

A good job ad is a marketing tool. It is designed to attract and engage your ideal candidate. It is honest and inspiring. Most importantly, it focuses on "what's in it for the candidate".

Use these questions to get you started:

  • - What exciting project/product/strategy will I be working on?
  • - What will I be working on in the first 60-90 days, and what can I expect to learn?
  • - Is this somewhere I’ll make a big impact on a market/company/technology?
  • - Describe the leaders and teammates I’ll work with, are they smart, fun and inspiring?
  • - What other interesting challenges will I get to tackle?
  • - Describe the market opportunity. How does this role impact business objectives?
  • - Your company is on an exciting path, tell the story of how this role plays a key part in the thrilling adventure.

Think about your dream candidate.

What will make them excited enough to stop what they’re doing and pay attention to you? This is a marketing exercise. It needs to be full of excitement, authenticity and truth— no cheese, no fluff. You need to know your intended audience, and then give them a genuine summary of what you can do for them and how they’ll truly make an impact as a member of your team.

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10
Mar 2016

As I saw the conversations pop up across social media related to International Women's Day, I'm compelled to add some of my experience to the dialogue. This article in particular, 14 Rules for Being a Woman in Business, does a great job of highlighting the fact that the problem of gender inequality in senior roles is still big on a global scale, but that there many great ways to get yourself into the critical minority. This piece spoke to leadership roles across all industries, but in the tech sector specifically, we know that the numbers of women in leadership roles looks at least this bad - or maybe worse. It would be easy to conclude, that most CEO's have a bias against hiring women into senior roles - that they systematically ignore qualified female job applicants in favour of their masculine peers. I think this is totally false. From my seat, as an advisor to tech companies looking to hire leaders and other scarce and talented teammates, I see something that probably comes as a surprise. In almost EVERY SINGLE SEARCH we take on, there is an unprompted and quite serious request that we focus on finding a woman for the role. Each company wants first to find the most qualified person for the role, but assuming that we'll turn up at least a handful of exceptional options, they want us to put extra effort into ensuring that they have a few great women to choose from. These jobs are not only in areas where you'd expect to find more women, in marketing or HR, but across the board, in engineering, finance, operations and sales. Our leaders know that they'll benefit from diversity in their board room, and that the great women moving up the ranks need and want role models. It turns out that the demand for women in the top ranks of tech companies isn't the problem. In fact demand for our top female leaders far outstrips supply. The challenge, it seems to me, is not about limited opportunities, but rather a limited number of strong women who are ready, willing and able to move into senior jobs. I know that pointing out this truth does not solve the problem. But perhaps it shifts the conversation just slightly. If you are an exceptional woman who wants to pursue leadership, you have reason to be optimistic. The data and the anecdotal evidence show that your journey will not be easy, but if you can find your path, a few good mentors and some serious conviction, there are many great tech companies that will welcome you with open arms.

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Artemis Canada – Executive Search

We are a boutique executive search firm exclusively serving Canada’s Innovation Economy.

Our partners are the inventors, builders and leaders who are changing our world, enriching the lives of their teams, strengthening their communities and delivering valuable innovations to global marketplaces.

Testimonials

"I have worked closely with Kristina for approximately 15 years, reaching out to her whenever we are searching for the hardest to find skills. She understands the industry, she’s smart, she listens to exactly what we need, and she never wastes our time. Kristina, and the Artemis team, deliver time and time again. When we need an external recruiter, I find it hard to work with anyone else!"

Pete Devenyi, VP Global Software Dematic

Contact Artemis

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    Waterloo N2J 3A1
  • 519-594-0913
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